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  • Favorite drills or tips for improving accuracy?

     JonnyRocket updated 10 months, 1 week ago 2 Members · 2 Posts
  • JonnyRocket

    Member
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    As someone new to handguns I’m curious of your tips and drills.

    I’m taking lessons but also want to make the most of my shooting time when solo. Trying to average 200+ rounds a week to break in the gun (VP9) and teach myself quicker.

  • Tam212

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Incorporating a dry practice regimen.

    Validating that dry practice with precision/trigger control drills like Dot Torture and shooting B-8 targets.

  • West_Desert

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Welcome to the hobby! You picked a nice gun too. Here’s a few bits to get you started.

    1) Practice dry firing. A quick way to do this is to balance a bullet on top on the gun and dry fire it without the bullet falling off or shaking. Even helps to just practice holding it steady.

    2) Practice how you hold the gun. There are a lot of wrong ways to hold a gun, so make sure you’re doing this well. My tip is to think about finger placement on the trigger first. You want the center of the pad of your finger on the trigger, not the knuckle or your fingertip.

    3) Dot torture. Either buy a pre-made dot torture target, or just get a bunch of those little stickers and place them on a piece of paper. Start at 10ft, and move the target out by 5ft incrementally until you’re comfortable at about 25ft.

    4) Watch your reactions and your breathing. Be careful not to jerk the gun a little bit before firing. It’s a habit that a lot of people get into when they anticipate recoil. As for your breathing, the standard trick is to take a deep breath, exhale a bit, hold it, aim and shoot.

    5) [The most important piece of advice.](https://i.giphy.com/media/XxvBXSD95ty37oRCl6/giphy.gif)

  • AndyC_DFW

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    1″ orange round stickers all over the paper – shoot 5 rounds for group at each sticker at 5 or 7 yards. See how small you can get the groups – it’s close enough that any screw-up on your part should be immediately visible, so it’s good feedback.

  • zmannz1984

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    I do a lot of dry fire practice. A LOT. Sometimes I just aim and shoot at the TV, watching for flinches and unwanted movements. Other times I do the penny balance trick on the front sight/front of slide. The penny trick will help you find the right contact point between your finger and the trigger.

    At the range, I have a few tricks to help me become more aware and able to control my firing. The first thing is my warm up drill. I start out by shooting a full mag and just try not to try to be precise. It gets me back used to the recoil after all the dry fire at home. Next, I do 5-10 shots at a 6 inch target by way of a checklist. Step 1, attain the correct grip. Step 2, attain the correct sight picture. Step 3, acquire the target. Step 4, clear my head. Step 5, aim and squeeze, trying to forget the gun is loaded. Step 6, keep the gun on target through cycling. Once I feel good about that, it is time for dot torture.

    One big problem I have is after a few weeks of no range time, I have a tendency to anticipate recoil and movement of firing. To counter this, I will switch out guns between a 22 and larger calibers. After a couple mags of 10mm, it is sometimes funny how bad my first shot with the 22 is when I switch back. I have am at the point where once I see it happen I stop doing it for the day, but I hope to get that gone altogether. It helps to have the same feel of gun between calibers but that isn’t required. I usually switch between an SP-01 in 9mm and one in 22.

    Another fun thing to do at the home range (not allowed at my indoor range for some reason) is load a random snap cap into each mag. This helps me see if I am anticipating and also makes me practice dealing with misfires.

    Hope that helps!

  • Ravendusk1996

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    For me I’m more accurate when I don’t think about the shot, don’t take too long to squeeze the trigger and just shoot. Confidence helps

  • JKmart0102

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    I try to load my magazines only about halfway for a decent amount of the time. I have less new shots on the target to look at as a grouping to see what I’m doing a little more easily. Also you get to spend a little more time at the range which is always a bonus.

  • FAPietroKoch

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Great gun – own 3 myself…
    Can’t add much to what’s been said, only you can order some great dot torture targets on Amazon.

  • ReadyStandby

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Dot torture.

  • TruantJ

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    The mantis x system has helped develop smoother trigger pull. You can probably achieve the same result by doing dry fire drills and the penny technique, but if you want an interactive feedback system other than the range, it’s pretty handy. And it’s cool if you like data

  • blackhawk_12

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    I like to shoot at playing cards. Cheap, easy and its a small target.

  • my_name_is_chaos_2

    Guest
    December 18, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Dry firing will help a lot. If possible, get the 22lr conversion kit. Practice your 7 fundamentals with high emphasis on trigger control, grip, and sight alignment.

    I don’t recommend wasting ammo like that to break the gun in. Sandpaper and file is much more effective. On the cheap, I would just use sand. Dip the gun in sand and rack it like a 1000 times. The sand will loosen up the parts and smooth out the roughness and any tight tolerance.

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