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Firearm and Gun Forums Firearm and Gun Forums Fishing Fly Fishing Got a hopefully not stupid question. I can cast 30 to 40 ft with relative accura…

  • Got a hopefully not stupid question. I can cast 30 to 40 ft with relative accura…

     Jeremy updated 10 months, 1 week ago 2 Members · 2 Posts
  • Jeremy

    Member
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Got a hopefully not stupid question. I can cast 30 to 40 ft with relative accuracy in my backyard. But I am casting the entire length of line as opposed to shooting line. Generally speaking if I wish to achieve say, a 60 ft cast, how much of that line should I be casting as opposed to shooting at the end of the cast? It would seem to me that when you're fishing in close quarters, like a small stream with a lot of brush around that you would want to cast as little as possible and shoot as much line as you can. Hope I'm explaining this properly. What do you think… (Not even THINKING about double hauling yet.)

  • C.J. Morris

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Following.

  • Robert Lefler

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Depends on the head length of your line. Weight forward is about 30′ head, so you want to start with that. Shooting heads have much shorter, compact heads and are made for starting short and shooting long.

  • Cardo Lianez

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    It’s also a factor of the rod. I don’t fish stiff rods on small brush choked waters. Softer graphite or fiberglass will load faster with less line and generate the line speed needed to ‘shoot’ line better than a stiff one that needs more line (weight, head or amount of line out) to shoot it. On bigger water I reach for my stiff rods and sometimes even fish an Orvis bank shot—talk about a big head that zips through the guides!

  • Joel Stephen Watts

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Generally speaking, close quarters means you don’t have a large body of water to cast too so longer cast aren’t required. If for some reason, you find a large body of water and you can’t be in it to cast without restriction, it’s hard to get enough line speed without hauling to make a long cast from short line.

    In close quarters, I generally rely on a bow and arrow and roll cast to get the job done. I very rarely back cast when there is brush or overhanging obstructions nearby.

  • Donald Brian Ward

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I am no pro, need to say that first.

    When you say casting in back yard, and 60ft cast, then ask about small streams, I think of myself! You will need lots of flies!

    I learned the roll cast early. That allowed me to stay somewhat out of trees. Then I leaned to use a longer rod, and just kind of “flip” the fly to where I wanted it.

    The small streams just don’t need that much line out. No way to manage the drift with out being in rocks and branches. Save the big cast for big water.

  • Scott Long

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Research different heads on fly lines, and you will find your answers

  • Dan Jones

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Learn to roll cast.

  • TJ Norris

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Are there places you need 60’ casts?

  • Greg Stuart

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I believe somewhere around 20% for the shoot, so 50’ to shoot to 60’. This depends on the line and your skills of course. It’s a cool exercise to pick up at say 20’ to 30’ and see how far you can shoot.

  • Todd Reashore

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Grab a Skagit line and perfect your spey cast.

  • Manuel Buda

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Don’t get hung up on distance… especially if we’re talking about smaller streams… depends on what technique you’re using, but still… saltwater might be another story.

  • Johan de Rooij

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I do fhis 5wt F 185grain/12gram flyline form Bario fly lines look at site ,

  • Thomas Perrie

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    The rod does the work. If you load it, you can shoot 60 ft with one back cast. I’d consider changing tactics to keep a shorter distance based on what you described though.

  • Ian Forbes

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    In 70 years of fly fishing all over the globe I can only think of 5 times when I needed to cast over 80 feet of line on a river. Fishing off the beach and casting into the ocean is a different story. You are sometimes fighting a wind as well as having to toss your fly out to where the fish are holding. In a lake you are usually in a boat and can move closer. 90% of successful fishing requires good line control, and the closer you are the better the line control… right up to the point where you are using a tenkara rod, or are Euro-nymphing with no fly line at all.

  • Warren Lee

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    If you do more research on the different fly lines for different applications it will be helpful for you. If you want to be able to shoot a long distance, get a style line with a heavier and shorter head section. I was able to double my cast by just changing line. Also don’t be intimidated by the double haul, it’s important to learn for shooting fly line and you will find it’s easy when you figure out the timing of it.

  • Mark Matheson

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Sounds like I would roll cast, or do a side cast, so my back cast is going up/down the river. First time I fly fished was in small streams in Georgia, and it was a tough place to learn. That’s what I ended up doing.

  • Mike Wasicko

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    For just casting (because 30-40 feet is way more than enough for fishing streams and smaller rivers), if you are using a WF line, try getting the head of the line in the air. If you stop at the right point, it should shoot even without a haul. Once the mechanics are right, it almost shoots itself.

  • Jerry Yates

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Best thing to do is not teach yourself bad casting habits. Take a couple lessons (if you can from an FFI casting instructor) then after that, practice practice and more practice, especially on the water. There is my two cents worth.

  • Andrew Derr

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Some good tips here. You will need to learn to double haul to shoot more line.

  • James Shelton

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    In some places I fish if you are casting more than 10 feet your usually in a 🌲 somewhere 🎣🎣🐡🐡🐠🐟🐟🦈🐟🎣🎣🎣

  • James Wades

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Without seeing your technique, this is a difficult question to answer. Just guessing, but it may be a problem with your “release point.” For example, the beginning fly caster is often taught to cast between the “ten o’clock and two o’clock position, or something similar depending on the rod action, etc. however you may need to change the release position for your forward cast. That is; keep the same distance between the back cast and forward cast and the same rhythm to load the rod, but release lower in the direction you want to shoot your line. For example back cast stop at noon and forward cast at nine o’clock or so. Don’t worry about double haul. It’s useful, but it’s also not a replacement for proper technique. I hope this helps. Also, read some of the comments above, there’s a lot of good wisdom up there! Good luck!

  • Nic Dudash

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Depends on your skill level, you should be able to shoot 10’ of line even as a novice. I generally try to shoot 20-30% of my distance so I don’t have to work so hard to cast line especially when you throw obstacles in the mix. Just focus on shooting 5’ in the beginning then work no longer distances. If you want are able to double haul in some situations you can cast 50-75% of your distance but if your trying shoot line single hand and no haul then 20-30% is a reasonable goal

  • Rodger Phillips

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I think most fish are caught between 20 and 30 feet away. Beyond that is a waste of line.

  • Rick O’Hara

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    If there is a fly shop around, approach them about some casting instruction. With good casting technique you should be able to shoot about 50% of the amount of line outside your guides. You may not need to distance cast, but the same techniques that allow you to throw a distance also help you to cast into the wind.

  • Dan Houchin

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Sounds like a loop size problem. The loop is the u shape bend of the line in the air. Try to get your loop to 18 to 24” on a normal cast. A larger loop is a waste of energy. Wrist movement and rod tip arc determine the loop size. The rod tip should travel in a straight line. Too much arc or too much wrist action will open up the loop. The only wrist action should be a very quick very shallow snap at the very end of the cast in both directions. You can practici this in slow motion by dragging the line on mowed grass and snapping the line off the grass at the end of the movement. You want the line to shoot out straight falling to the grass. Get the timing down the add the double haul which has the same timing as the snap.

  • Jim Jowsey

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Tons of great information, thank you. I know there’s a million and one different variables but I was kind of referring to just general skills development. Thanks again!

  • Jay Choi

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    From a pragmatic perspective, no one really casts 30-40 feet in small streams. Keep in mind you also have 6-9 feet of leader and tippet, too. Line control on moving water will be the factor to catching fish and having 40-50 feet of moving line on the water, you’ll soon see how little control you’ll have.

    Now, to address casting vs shooting: how much you CAN shoot out depends upon the momentum of your line. The more line you have out, and the more speed you have determines the momentum you have to carry out (shoot out) the free line you have. To increase line speed, you’d use techniques like double-haul. Now determining if you cast 30 feet vs cast 20 feet and shoot 10 feet in a small stream might be determined by the open area for your back cast. If you only have 20 feet of clearing behind you, backcasting 30 feet will get you snagged. So, clearly, casting 20 and shooting 10 is your “solution”.

  • Steve Mevers

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I think you are asking how much of the actual fly line do you have out of the fly rod when you release it on a long cast. WF lines have a heavier portion of line in the front part, usually between 20-40 feet long. A lot of lines will even have a different color on that portion of line. On longer cast I usually will only have that portion of line extending from the tip on my rod on the final forward cast and the remaining running line I shoot is laying on the deck or in a stripping basket.

  • Dianne Segien Riehl

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I’m not great at casting by any means but in close quarters I use the roll cast. It’s a must in New Hampshire where I live. So many trees. 😬😬😬

  • Jeffrey Lefebvre

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I’ve been teaching casting for more than 25 years. BY FAR the #1 casting problem I address with people is throwing a curving back cast. Once people straighten their back cast, they begin to truly load the rod- for the first time. Once you learn this- distance and shooting line becomes far easier. Adding a double haul before you have a cast that is straight is counter-productive. If your leader frequently piles up on delivery- particularly to the side of your flyline path- you are throwing a curving back cast.

  • Robert Voissem

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    My people are catching fish within 30-40 ft. If you need to get closer, I propose two ideas: wading or getting a boat!

  • Jeff Perin

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I get it. So if you are ending up with a 60 foot cast and want to do another cast, you should strip in at least 30 feet. The head of most traditional tapered WF lines is about 30 feet so at that point you’re not trying to lift and aerialize the head of the line with the lighter, thinner (less mass) running line coming out of the rod tip. Not impossible to do, but not ideal either.
    In a real world situation, say on a lake or streamer fishing a river, you’ll probably be stripping in all but 6 to 10 feet of line and then working all of that out again (and again and again), so sometimes when you’re practicing strip in to have 10 feet of line left, and then cast back out to your desired distance.
    I’ve been a guide and a casting instructor for 35 years and wish more people would practice so I’m stoked that you are doing it and asking good questions. Good luck.

  • Kelly Ferguson

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Learn to double haul and shoot the line on the double haul its amazing

  • Jim Neill

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Clean and dress your line every time you go fishing.

  • Brian Townsend

    Guest
    December 17, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    I would suggest 2 things. One your rod isn’t getting properly loaded on back cast. Try just making back cast and seeing if you can lay the line out straight behind you. Two… I wonder if you are releasing the line with your non rod hand too soon on your forward cast? My guess is if you are making false casts already that are adding distance to your aerialized line this suggests you are “shooting” at least 5-10 feet of line and something is happening with your technique on the final cast. So…How much line are you “shooting” out in your hand in your false casting? You should at least be getting that much out on your final cast

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